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Let Your Lawyer Do Their Job

By Allison Schreiber Lee

When you get sick, you go to the doctor, and you recognize your best chance for recovery is to follow the doctor’s advice. Yet, when some people hire an attorney, they insist on trying to litigate the matter on their own. Not only is it frustrating for both the attorney and the client, but it is typically a recipe for wasted time and money—something no attorney wants for their clients. When people hire me as their lawyer, it’s not my job to take over their life or micromanage the minutiae of their days, but it is my job to advise them on how to act to allow us the best opportunity to get them the best outcome possible.

Clients are often worried about costs of litigation and that’s a reasonable concern, but not asking your attorney for advice on things such as agreeing to an interim custody plan, agreeing on paying various non-necessary expenses, and agreeing to divide property or accounts now, can often lead to costly mistakes in the long run. I tell my clients that my job as an attorney is to try to see eight steps ahead of where we are; making a hasty decision now and agreeing to something with your spouse without asking your attorney first may not just mess up the next steps in your case, it may take you down a different (and often unwanted) path entirely.

So spend the time to talk to your attorney about strategy, about what you want in the long-run, and then listen to what they have to say. Spending 30 minutes on the phone with your attorney is almost always worth the price now, saving you stress and costs in the long term.

For any family law questions, please contact the attorneys at Paule, Camazine & Blumenthal, P.C.

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Allison Schreiber Lee

Allison Schreiber Lee

Allison Schreiber Lee is a seasoned trial attorney and has been lead counsel in more than 40 jury trials. In 2011, Ms. Schreiber Lee was co-lead counsel in one of the longest jury trials in the history of the City of St. Louis. Ms. Lee has also tried more than 100 non-jury trials to verdict, including representation in divorce and modification hearings.