The dreaded letter from the Juvenile Court

By December 29, 2011Juvenile Court

By Paule, Camazine & Blumenthal, P.C. of Paule, Camazine & Blumenthal, P.C. posted in Juvenile Court on Thursday, December 29, 2011.

By Susan E. Block

When you receive a NOTICE OF INFORMAL ADJUSTMENT CONFERENCE from the Family Court of St. Louis County, what should you do? Call an experienced family law lawyer with particular expertise in juvenile matters. If you contact the Deputy Juvenile Officer whose name appears on this letter, she may suggest otherwise. However, to properly protect your child’s rights and to be sure that both your child and you as a parent understand this meeting, it is wise to be represented at this informal conference.

The purpose of the conference is to discuss an offense which your child has allegedly committed or was involved in to bring him or her within the jurisdiction (or power) of the Family Court. At the conference, the DJO will discuss her recommendation for action or conduct in the interest of the juvenile to correct the condition of behavior or environment which may exist. In addition, she will inquire about the juvenile’s general behavior, home and school environment. Likely, with the proper legal advice, the conference will result in your entering into a contract with the court with actions to address the offense and ancillary concerns.

This is an opportunity to avoid going before a Judge and having the allegation heard formally. It is a time for your child to take responsibility and move ahead.

Experienced representation at this meeting is a good investment in your child’s future.

Disclaimer

Susan E. Block

Susan E. Block

Susan Block returned to the practice of law after retiring as a Circuit Judge in 2004 with 25 years of judicial service. In her last judicial assignment, she was appointed to serve as the Administrative Judge of the Family Court with the authority to manage the policies and practices of this division, while maintaining a full caseload of abuse, neglect, delinquency and adoption matters. She uses this extensive experience in her practice, which includes juvenile and family law matters.
Susan E. Block

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