Talking to a Lawyer Before You Decide to File for Divorce

By February 15, 2017Divorce

Paule, Camazine & Blumenthal, P.C. posted in Divorce on Wednesday, February 15, 2017.

By Susan E. Block

Most people who enter in a marriage are not planning on divorcing. They are hoping for a long and happy life with their spouse. Statistics, however, show that many marriages do not succeed for reasons such as infidelity, growing apart, mental illness, substance abuse, and failure by the couple to resolve critical issues that arise between them. In short, where there is an atmosphere at home of mistrust and discomfort, divorce often follows.

Sometimes, suspicions arise when one spouse sees that the other is moving financial accounts, changing passwords, behaving atypically, or making hurtful or cruel statements. This might be a signal that divorce is on the horizon.

Seeking legal advice on options to consider may be critical to your future and to that of your children.

Experienced lawyers can educate you on family law practices and procedures that may save your financial resources from being misused and your life from being detrimentally impacted. It is important to understand what the law provides regarding maintenance (alimony), child support, child custody, and distribution of property and debt.

You may not be ready to take any legal action at this time, but having information about these areas will help you be prepared to deal with the situation however it unfolds.

The lawyers at Paule, Camazine & Blumenthal have years of experience in counseling prospective clients as to their rights and responsibilities in family law matters. A legal consultation is an excellent investment in feeling more knowledgeable and secure in your life planning.

Disclaimer

Susan E. Block

Susan E. Block

Susan Block returned to the practice of law after retiring as a Circuit Judge in 2004, with 25 years of judicial service. In her last judicial assignment she was appointed to serve as the Administrative Judge of the Family Court with the authority to manage the policies and practices of this division, while maintaining a full caseload of abuse, neglect, delinquency and adoption matters.